Same scene, no textures. .sky background. (Desert Dusk, or something. I really like it. It goes well with a number of the Maxwell out of box HDRI clouds).

Same scene, no textures. .sky background. (Desert Dusk, or something. I really like it. It goes well with a number of the Maxwell out of box HDRI clouds).

I had a lot of fun with this guy. Interior image based lighting. No post-processing (maybe some curves). Will post alternates in a moment. This is for the Friends Academy in Long Island, NY.

I had a lot of fun with this guy. Interior image based lighting. No post-processing (maybe some curves). Will post alternates in a moment. This is for the Friends Academy in Long Island, NY.

I know I’ve been meaning to update this for a while now. Over the next couple days, I’ll see if I can get some tasty renderings up for all to see.
This first one is a re-render of what was a rather gnarly night scene, and I use gnarly in the pejorative. There was a lot of photoshopping going on and a very minimal amount of displacement mapping. The result is something more stylized than photo-realistic, but worth sharing none-the-less.
 This is an evening shot, rendered in Maxwell Render, out of Sketchup, and post processed in Photoshop, of the Doyle Hall renovations for the Notre Dame of Maryland University, circa Design Development phase. 

I know I’ve been meaning to update this for a while now. Over the next couple days, I’ll see if I can get some tasty renderings up for all to see.

This first one is a re-render of what was a rather gnarly night scene, and I use gnarly in the pejorative. There was a lot of photoshopping going on and a very minimal amount of displacement mapping. The result is something more stylized than photo-realistic, but worth sharing none-the-less.

 This is an evening shot, rendered in Maxwell Render, out of Sketchup, and post processed in Photoshop, of the Doyle Hall renovations for the Notre Dame of Maryland University, circa Design Development phase. 

Work in progress… Playing with a few post-processing effects. Will post final product as it comes together.

Work in progress… Playing with a few post-processing effects. Will post final product as it comes together.

So, I figure it’s close enough to the holidays that I can upload these two graphics and not violate any sort of marketing sensitivity. Like the last pool image, this is not something I modeled, but rendered and post-processed for a continuing effort at the office.

These are pretty heavily stylized, which is a trend I’m marking in myself these days, and is probably heavy influenced by my Tera gaming habits these days.

Rather than try to figure out any real material qualities, I opted instead to sort of fake it in the Maxwell Studio editor. There’s no artificial lighting of which to speak (never modeled, and faking it wouldn’t work, I felt, in this instance), so I had to crank up the anti-vignetting all the way. The result is a fun and cheerful graphic, that was ultimately swapped out by dancing Santas for an analagous assignment.

This was a lot of fun to make, but photorealistic, it is not. Then again, I’m finding that fun graphics that generate enthusiasm are striking more chords than photorealistic renderings in my line of work.

That warrants all kinds of discussion, but I’d like to open the floor by saying that photorealism as a means of architectural production by and large leads to expections, where as stylized renderings leads to possibility. Thoughts?

Hey guys. I learned how to bloom in Maxwell Render. Everything will be lens flares forever! (Sorry for the low quality. I took the picture with my cell phone, don’t ask).

Hey guys. I learned how to bloom in Maxwell Render. Everything will be lens flares forever! (Sorry for the low quality. I took the picture with my cell phone, don’t ask).

This is another rendering I did, this time playing around with HDR stitching in photoshop. Again, it was modeled in sketchup, this time of a competition pool I am working on. Not sure if it is too early in the project to name which one, as we’re still wrapping up Schematic Design Phase.
I wanted to point out quickly that I did not model this, but did do all of the rendering and post processing. Like the NDMU project and its grass displacement, I had an awesome water texture I had created that got scrapped to meet the deadline. As a result, I rendered the water as a glossy finish, and photoshopped the sketchup texture on top.
What made this one more fun to work with, was that I played around with the Maxwell Sliders after cooking it for about 2 days. Due the fact that it was a large space with no artificial light, the far end was overbloomed with light, and the near end was too dark. So I saved out 4-5 different HDRs at different light settings, Then I stitched them together in photoshop using the HDRI batch tool.
I really should grab the originals to show you how it came out. Either way, I cleaned it up with minimal success (which is why I uploaded a low res version, to minimize the appearance of goof ups). If you shrink this guy down, it look kinds of neat, I think.

This is another rendering I did, this time playing around with HDR stitching in photoshop. Again, it was modeled in sketchup, this time of a competition pool I am working on. Not sure if it is too early in the project to name which one, as we’re still wrapping up Schematic Design Phase.

I wanted to point out quickly that I did not model this, but did do all of the rendering and post processing. Like the NDMU project and its grass displacement, I had an awesome water texture I had created that got scrapped to meet the deadline. As a result, I rendered the water as a glossy finish, and photoshopped the sketchup texture on top.

What made this one more fun to work with, was that I played around with the Maxwell Sliders after cooking it for about 2 days. Due the fact that it was a large space with no artificial light, the far end was overbloomed with light, and the near end was too dark. So I saved out 4-5 different HDRs at different light settings, Then I stitched them together in photoshop using the HDRI batch tool.

I really should grab the originals to show you how it came out. Either way, I cleaned it up with minimal success (which is why I uploaded a low res version, to minimize the appearance of goof ups). If you shrink this guy down, it look kinds of neat, I think.

This was a fun exercise in stylism. It’s the New Academic Building for the Notre Dame of Maryland University’s School of Nursing. Partially modeled by me, and partially modeled by one of my supervisors, this was my first real project that I provided design support on.
I had some time to kill at the end of the project, and wanted play around with a copy of Maxwell Render that I had on my workstation machine, so I thought I’d cook the sketchup model we made and play around with hdri background skies.
First thing I noticed was that because the raw file was a hollow model of the exterior of the building, the glass was a bit of a pain to work with. Using mirror surfaces made an entirely fake image, so I opted instead for a quick rendering translucent glass which I faked a reflection in photoshop using the hdri sky. So you can kind of see through it into an empty building, which is somewhat unsuccessful.
I ended up going a little nuts in photoshop, so the end product looks decidedly unrealistic. I had originally planned to use a nice displacement map I had found for grass, but the pre-processing time was just a bear. I only had an afternoon to render this guy, so I decided to foregore the grass and tried to cover it up with existing photographs of the site and a little postprocessing.
The high res link looks pretty nice. There are a lot of fun little details. If I had a little more time and effort, I’d clean it up a little bit more. Luckily, that’s why I kept the .psd file for this one!

This was a fun exercise in stylism. It’s the New Academic Building for the Notre Dame of Maryland University’s School of Nursing. Partially modeled by me, and partially modeled by one of my supervisors, this was my first real project that I provided design support on.

I had some time to kill at the end of the project, and wanted play around with a copy of Maxwell Render that I had on my workstation machine, so I thought I’d cook the sketchup model we made and play around with hdri background skies.


First thing I noticed was that because the raw file was a hollow model of the exterior of the building, the glass was a bit of a pain to work with. Using mirror surfaces made an entirely fake image, so I opted instead for a quick rendering translucent glass which I faked a reflection in photoshop using the hdri sky. So you can kind of see through it into an empty building, which is somewhat unsuccessful.

I ended up going a little nuts in photoshop, so the end product looks decidedly unrealistic. I had originally planned to use a nice displacement map I had found for grass, but the pre-processing time was just a bear. I only had an afternoon to render this guy, so I decided to foregore the grass and tried to cover it up with existing photographs of the site and a little postprocessing.

The high res link looks pretty nice. There are a lot of fun little details. If I had a little more time and effort, I’d clean it up a little bit more. Luckily, that’s why I kept the .psd file for this one!

It’s been a while since I’ve updated this, so I thought I would share a bit of what I’ve been doing in the meantime, since I started working at my current job. I think my representation skills have grown a bit over the last year and a half, though let’s be honest, a lot of this is due to increased accessibility to, and advances in, hardware.
In addition to building a new desktop with tasty 8-core processor, I have access to its intel counterpart at work. I wouldn’t say that I have pushed more towards photosrealism, but I think I’ve made do with what skills and hardware I have, and have put more effort into post-processing.
Either way, let’s see if I’ve gotten any better!
This first image was rendered using Indigo Render v1.2 out of sketchup. It was intended to be used as a site map of the Oregon Episcopal School and as a result was rendered with chipboard textures representing ground planes and phong white materials as the buildings.
This guy took about 2 days on my old machine at work, and as you can see it came out grainy, and probably could definitely use some loving and re-rendering. Hardware restraints held me from modeling this in greater detail, as this guy started get up there in the polygon. Still, for a keyplan graphic, I’m not entirely unhappy with it.

It’s been a while since I’ve updated this, so I thought I would share a bit of what I’ve been doing in the meantime, since I started working at my current job. I think my representation skills have grown a bit over the last year and a half, though let’s be honest, a lot of this is due to increased accessibility to, and advances in, hardware.

In addition to building a new desktop with tasty 8-core processor, I have access to its intel counterpart at work. I wouldn’t say that I have pushed more towards photosrealism, but I think I’ve made do with what skills and hardware I have, and have put more effort into post-processing.

Either way, let’s see if I’ve gotten any better!

This first image was rendered using Indigo Render v1.2 out of sketchup. It was intended to be used as a site map of the Oregon Episcopal School and as a result was rendered with chipboard textures representing ground planes and phong white materials as the buildings.

This guy took about 2 days on my old machine at work, and as you can see it came out grainy, and probably could definitely use some loving and re-rendering. Hardware restraints held me from modeling this in greater detail, as this guy started get up there in the polygon. Still, for a keyplan graphic, I’m not entirely unhappy with it.